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The Ice Miller Blog

Greg Dunn and Lindsay Miller to Present at Smart Regions Conference

October 23, 2017
Attorneys Greg Dunn and Lindsay Miller are speakers at the upcoming Smart Regions Conference on Oct. 25 at the BB&T Arena in Newport, Ky. In its first year, the Midwest Internet of Things (IoT) Showcase and Smart Regions Conference includes speakers, presentations, awards and a number of exhibitions, as well as a professional drone race.


Smart Cities and Communities Act of 2017 Introduced

October 17, 2017 by Lindsay M. Miller, Partner
On Oct. 2, 2017, Sen. Cantwell, Maria [D-WA] introduced the Smart Cities and Communities Act of 2017 (S.1904) to “promote smart technologies and systems to improve community livability, services, communication, safety, mobility, energy productivity, and resilience to natural and manmade disasters, to reduce costs, traffic congestion, and air pollution, and to promote economic growth and opportunities for communities of all sizes…”


Nick Merker and Lindsay Miller to Present on Autonomous Vehicles at IoT Summit

October 9, 2017
On Oct. 18, Ice Miller attorneys Nick Merker and Lindsay Miller will present "Rules of the Road: State and Local Government Considerations for Autonomous Vehicle Initiatives" at the Internet of Things (IoT) Summit Chicago. Nick and Lindsay will be joined by Robert Schill of HERE Technologies.


Court Dismisses FTC’s Unfairness Claims Regarding Potential Data Breaches

October 3, 2017 by George A. Gasper, Partner
Several months ago, as part of the Federal Trade Commission’s continuing regulation of the Internet of Things (“IoT”) security practices, the FTC filed a complaint against D-Link Corporation (and DLS, its U.S. subsidiary), alleging that they failed to take reasonable steps to secure their routers and Internet Protocol cameras, which potentially compromised sensitive consumer information, including live video and audio feeds. The case was notable because the agency did not allege that particular breaches actually occurred, but rather that “the company failed to take steps to address well-known and easily preventable security flaws” and put “thousands of consumers at risk,” despite allegedly marketing its products as secure and supporting “the latest wireless security features.”


New Self-Driving Vehicle Legislation Cruises Onto Senate Floor

Two United States Senators introduced legislation on Sept. 28, 2017 to address the rapidly approaching reality of self-driving vehicles on American roads. The American Vision for Safer Transportation through Advancement of Revolutionary Technologies Act—or, more succinctly, the AV Start Act—paves the way for autonomous vehicles by establishing a regulatory framework to govern the development and implementation of this revolutionary technology. Like the Internet of Things Cybersecurity Improvements Act of 2017, which was introduced in the Senate in August, this latest legislative foray into the Internet of Things (“IoT”) is a bipartisan effort to get ahead of emerging technologies.


Tim Capen and Eric Goodman Will Present at Indy Big Data Conference

September 8, 2017 by Timothy J. Capen, Eric I. Goodman,
Tim Capen and Eric Goodman will be presenting “Starting and Funding Your New IoT Venture” at the Indy Big Data Conference on Sept. 14 in Indianapolis.


Attorney Sid Bose Will Present on Legal Issues and the Internet of Things at Upcoming CEDIA Expo

August 25, 2017
Ice Miller attorney Sid Bose will present “Building Secure – Understanding the Legal Issues in the Internet of Things” at the Custom Electronic Design & Installation Association (CEDIA) Expo 2017 on Sept. 8 in San Diego.


New Internet of Things Security Legislation Introduced in U.S. Senate

August 3, 2017 by George A. Gasper, Partner
Four United States Senators introduced bipartisan legislation this week that would improve the cybersecurity of Internet-connected devices purchased by the federal government. The Internet of Things Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2017 (which was drafted with input from several security and technology companies) would require companies selling IoT devices to the government to implement specific security standards, including ensuring their devices: (i) do not have any known security vulnerabilities, (ii) do not use hard-coded passwords that cannot be changed, (iii) rely on industry standard protocols, and (iv) are patchable if security is compromised. (IoT devices with limited data processing and software functionality would be subject to alternative requirements to be developed by the Office of Management and Budget.)  The proposed legislation would also require (among other things) the Department of Homeland Security to issue additional guidelines regarding vulnerability disclosure policies applicable to companies selling IoT devices to the federal government.


Small Towns Targeted in ISIS Cyber-Vandalism

June 28, 2017 by Nicholas Reuhs, Nicole R. Woods,
Yesterday, websites for the Ohio Department of Administrative Services, Howard County (Maryland) and the town of Brookhaven (New York) were replaced with an ISIS message. There was no apparent reason that these government divisions were targeted.


Cyber and Kidnap/Ransom Insurance Should Respond to Massive Global Ransomware Attacks in More than 100 Countries

May 30, 2017 by Nicholas Reuhs, Partner
The recent ransomware attack led many to reevaluate how prepared their organizations are for such an event. While risk mitigation (i.e., prevention) is critical, so is risk transfer through insurance. Most cyber insurers offer cyber extortion coverage as part of their policies, although the coverage can sometimes be difficult to locate and analyze in the context of a larger cyber policy.


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